Tag Archives: Twilight Zone

Tomorrow is a New Day

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CC image courtesy of FHKE on Flickr.

Time machines are overrated. They are for old men and forgotten dreams. Those old coots forget that their memories aren’t static. These devices are relatively commonplace, but each time one of these ancient people return from their excursion, they come back broken as they realize their past is only a phantom.

Whether you visit the dream tailors to have fabricated dreams implanted or if you are viewing the past through an expanse of fifty years, you can see nothing beyond an illusion.

As the years pass, you have a tendency to forget some of the bad memories and the mundane moments fade into nothingness. In a sense, the Twilight Zone episode, “Of Late I Think of Cliffordville,” is a cautionary tale. Reality never measures up to the fantasy that has grown in your mind.

I realize that reality is elusive as we are suspended in a virtual reality. Our perspective won’t allow us to really see the world as it is. We only can view reality as we see it.

I just don’t care anymore.

Tomorrow, I’m going to disappear in the time machine. I’m tired of sitting in this living graveyard. Rest homes are convenient for the living, not the living dead.

I want to live a life of intrigue again. In the morning I’ll return to my youth as a Bedouin gun runner. At least that’s what I remember. I hope I’m not spanning fifty years to live a future of past disappointments. My excursion will be different than the others’.

Nurse, is it really time to take my Aricept again?


 

Written in response to the Daily Post’s writing prompt.

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The Obsolete Man

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Have you ever considered your impending obsolescence? Many societies revere the aged and the infirm, but America is a society that discards everything once it loses its luster. This is not confined to material goods. Old and sick people are shuttered up in homes. They are obsolete.

I’m reminded of an old Twilight Zone episode where a different kind of obsolete was dramatized. Burgess Meredith was “The Obsolete Man” because he was a librarian. Not just a librarian, but a bookworm who treasured his Bible.

His beliefs put him at odds with the State. He was to be liquidated because he served no purpose for the State. It’s chilling when he is sentenced to be executed for “serving no function.” It appears that this country is beginning to hold a similar view. That should be alarming even for the people “on the winning side.”

In this age of New Morality, promiscuity is encouraged and adhering to biblical values is not just considered old-fashioned. It is viewed as bigoted, narrow minded, and subversive.

Are we, as Christians, in danger of becoming obsolete? I think it is inevitable if we remain on this moral trajectory. We live in a world that is tolerant of all people except for Christians. That is a dangerous position to hold because the day may come where other groups are considered anachronistic.

Remember the conclusion of the episode where the Chancellor was declared obsolete? What if today’s accusers are denounced tomorrow?

This post is written in response to the Daily Post’s prompt Going Obsolete.

The Future is Yesterday

Quantum Leap is probably my favorite time travel show.  Some dude randomly goes back in time to correct ‘wrongs’ in history.  Through his hologram pal, he has access to a supercomputer named Ziggy that makes all of the probability calculations to determine the outcome of his actions on the future.  He even gets to experience others’ lives by hijacking their body while their soul hangs out in some waiting room in the future.  Now that I think about this time traveling bodysnatcher, it sounds kinda creepy.  To complicate matters, there was an evil leaper who went back in time to undo favorable moments in history.

Multiply that by a million.  If time travel is ever achieved, the technology will eventually be affordable enough for Mr. Average Joe to have his very own time machine.  A million potential time travelers is a reasonable number given that there are what, seven billion people on the planet?  A million people traipsing through time, crushing colorful butterflies with their muddy boots, and essentially bungling history.

Either our lives will become a series of Billy Pilgrimesque flashbacks, or there are infinite timelines.  For a universe that is finite, I find it hard to believe that anything infinite can come from it.  Besides, having a fractured lifetime could be somewhat interesting if you aren’t driven insane.

This could be a brave new world where not only is anything possible in the future, everything is possible in the past.

Perhaps the best place (or time) to go for the time traveler would be the future.  I would choose a method where you don’t even need a fancy phone booth.  I would choose to make the Rip Van Winkle Caper a reality.  I mean, who doesn’t like a good caper?

To mastermind a gold heist and to enjoy it after a hundred year slumber, you would have to be pretty fit.  One, because gold is really heavy.  Two, I don’t know if I would want to be riddled with arthritis in a future where everyone is a muscular android lizard person.  Actually, you might want to make a lizard person suit out of a set of footie-pajamas so you can blend in.

If you arise in the future and gold is worthless, oh well.  Just wait.  There are a million jokers traveling through time and they are bound to change your future.


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