Tag Archives: meatloaf

Top Your Meatloaf With This!

 

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My mom always topped meatloaf with ketchup. When I grew up I moved on to chili sauce, but recently I have experimented with my own sauce.

I know this sauce looks involved, but you really just need to dump and simmer. Simple.

I have a feeling that this will make an excellent BBQ sauce. I’m going to test it out.

1 1/2 cups ketchup
1 cup Chardonnay
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1/2 teaspoon Tony Chachere’s
2 tablespoons light brown sugar
1 teaspoon Sriracha sauce
1 teaspoon molasses
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 pinch ground thyme

Combine all ingredients and simmer until reduced.

This may look like a lot of work, but the sweet tanginess with a touch of spice makes a great sauce for meatloaf.

All photos courtesy of Stacy Crumpley.
All photos courtesy of Stacy Crumpley.

Or you can be lazy and reach for the ketchup. At least use balsamic ketchup.

(If you really feel adventurous, enjoy your meatloaf with remoulade sauce).

Best. Meatloaf. Ever.

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One of the preeminent comfort foods is meatloaf. It appears to be one of those dishes that is publicly jeered at, but secretly is coveted.

I have eaten meatloaf from many places. There certainly is awesome meatloaf and there is meatloaf that is only suitable for Gallagher’s Sledge-O-Matic. It’s still meatloaf and I hungrily shovel it in.

This particular meatloaf is an amalgamation of my experiences in trying different recipes, but it leans heavily on the freeform method that is typically in a mobile kitchen with Mercy Chefs. I just happened to write down the process today.

I look forward to your critique as I’d like to know where on the spectrum it belongs. Maybe Gallagher and I need to eat smashed meatloaf.

If you really want to enhance your experience, try serving with fresh remoulade sauce.

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Ingredients:

3 pounds ground chuck
1/2 cup breadcrumbs
1/4 cup dried parsley
1 tablespoon Italian seasoning
1/2 teaspoon cayenne
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon Sriracha
2 ounces Hormel crumbled bacon with black pepper

Method:

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

Mix ingredients thoroughly, but do not over mix as it will make the meatloaf really dense.

Form into loaf on cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.

Coat meatloaf with homemade sauce (or ketchup).

Cook for 75 minutes or until internal temperature is 150 degrees. Remove from oven and let rest. Internal temperature should rise to 160 at rest.

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Images courtesy of Stacy Crumpley.

 

 

 

Remoulade Sauce

Photo courtesy of Stacy Crumpley.
Photos courtesy of Stacy Crumpley.

I’m a big fan of remoulade sauce. It seems that you have a good chance of getting remoulade accompanying anything that is labeled as ‘cajun’ in a restaurant. Have you ever had fried alligator with a nice remoulade? No? Then you haven’t lived. I made this specifically to make a meatloaf sandwich. It was delicious. This recipe is adapted from Serious Eats. I followed the recipe pretty closely (which is rare), and I was pleased with the results. It tasted nothing like remoulade I’ve ever had, and it had a nice bite. I just wish I had horseradish to really punch it up.

Ingredients:

1 cup mayonnaise

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon finely chopped flat leaf parsley

1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce

2 teaspoons whole grain mustard

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

1 teaspoon paprika

2 Mezzetta Garlic & Dill Peperoncini peppers, minced

1 tablespoon Mezzetta sundried tomatoes in olive oil, minced

1 dash cayenne pepper

Method:

Combine ingredients and let rest in the refrigerator for an hour so the flavors can blend. IMG_5292-2

Feeding the Masses

I am spending my day at Common Ground Community (CGC) today. CGC is a faith-based organization and It’s quiet as I’m the only one here. This evening will resemble a three ring circus with kids running loose and parents being ministered to by our volunteers. I’m in charge of tonight’s meal.

I guess I’ve been volunteering here close to three years. I typically volunteer to create supper one Thursday a month. I think volunteering here and with Mercy Chefs are what helped me become comfortable with catering. It’s only a fledgling business and I’m not looking to make millions, just enough to contribute to our household so we can finally melt that debt snowball.

Most people who come here don’t know who I am or what I do. I like it that way. I hope they came for Jesus, but I’m sure many just come to get some of their basic needs met.

Sometimes it’s difficult for me to volunteer here as my wife and children have told me that on several occasions, they have heard people whine and disparage my food.

They hear this while serving the members of this community. I ignored what they said for a couple of years and kept making things like spaghetti and meatballs, meatloaf, BBQ chicken, and homemade bread. Along with the main courses were various sides and desserts. I usually don’t go all out on the sides, but the main courses and desserts have always been from scratch.

A couple of months ago, we were short handed. After I was done in the kitchen I went to serve meals. We serve cafeteria style to feed everyone quickly. That night I heard many negative remarks and only one positive remark. I’m not here to boost my ego, but I hope all of my effort is well received. I’m wasting everyone’s time if nobody wants to eat it.

After this experience, I looked back on my experiences with Mercy Chefs I served in Kenner, LA after a hurricane, West, TX after a plant explosion. (I think that was a feed plant.) I even spent time in Colorado after last year’s flooding. We have served thousands of meals and I have never heard anything negative on any of these adventures. There was only gratitude. Again, this isn’t about some pity trip I’m on. I’m just making observations.

I believe that the victims of disasters are so grateful because they just lost everything. The people I encounter in this neighborhood are victims of the system.

This system encourages government dependence. This system holds very little value for dads or for families with both a mom and a dad. This system encourages thug life where eight year olds try to act like their favorite hardcore rapper wif diamonds in their teefs.

Granted, there are many who come here and are struggling to raise their children properly. To raise them to have respect for their elders. To raise them to have respect for themselves.

Society as a whole can get locked in a groupthink mentality where they think it is best to throw money at the problem. To give handouts. CGC, a Bible believing organization, now appears to be transitioning from a handout system to one that encourages the individual to help himself. I’m not a fan of clichés but in a sense, to give a ‘hand up.’

Since hearing feedback firsthand for the food I expended so much love to prepare, I’m in a sort of transition. Maybe I should cook something more fundamental. Last month I made Hoppin’ John, a dish consisting of blackeyed peas and rice. Today, I’m making pinto beans and rice. Don’t worry, I’m going to have cornbread, too.

I still expend the same energy shopping, chopping, and cooking. These beans are going to taste out of this world, but for now, I’m offering two basic meals that we enjoy every week at home: beans and rice and rice and beans.

I can feed them today, but I hope they find the Bread of Life where they will never hunger again.