Tag Archives: judgmental

Opposing God

I was reading a Franklin Graham post on Facebook when I was reminded of the dark times we live in.  The subject of the post was concerning the legalization of homosexual marriage in Ireland.  We all know (whether you admit it or suppress it) that God defined marriage between one man and one woman.  We can force a square peg through a round hole and “redefine” anything we wish.  But that doesn’t make it true.  

I enjoy reading peoples’ responses on Facebook.  Sometimes you read something poignant, but most of the time it’s thoughtless bumper sticker rhetoric.  “Don’t Judge” is one of the most popular remarks.  I can understand that coming from a pagan, but professing Christians say it too.  It seems to escape these people that they are guilty of judgment when they tell people not to judge.  But to have so-called Christians disregarding scripture?  Is this the New Intolerance?

We must not do what is right in our own eyes.  We can see where that path leads by reading Judges.  I think that is the disconnect.  What do the statistics say regarding Christianity in America?  Seventy percent?  Eighty percent?  These statistics are so misleading because most of these people only like a Jesus that approves of them.  Their Christ didn’t die for their sins.  

Realistically, I wouldn’t be surprised if America is only ten or fifteen percent Christian.  The other sixty five percent are wannabe poseurs who think Matthew 7 teaches that it is wrong to judge and that God won’t punish lawbreakers.  These people think that they are good because they go to church, or not.  Maybe their worship is their own private affair when they are watching American Idol or cheating on their taxes.  It’s a smokescreen.  That own “private worship” business is oftentimes justification for their lawless hearts.

It’s no wonder that pagans call us hypocrites because we act just like they do.  We stand on the Bible regarding homosexual marriage, but we forget about divorce.  We appear to be the wet blanket at the party when we oppose sin instead of upholding virtue.  It’s not a matter of preference.  It is a matter of right and wrong.

We don’t define sin.  God does.  Yet, we tell people to avoid sin because it is wrong or even gross.  Try looking at sin from God’s perspective.  All sin, divorce, rape, murder, homosexuality, blasphemy–all sins aren’t merely aberrant.  God views sin as abominable.

Why can’t we just let people persist in their sin?  It’s not hurting us Christians.  That’s not what Paul says.  He states, “Though they know God’s righteous decree that those who practice such things deserve to die, they not only do them but give approval to those who practice them.” (‭Romans‬ ‭1‬:‭32‬ ESV)  Our approval of sin or even our winking at sin is an abomination.  

If we encourage any sin, we are in rebellion.  If we stand for and support sin, we may as well be participants.  We are opposing God.  How can a Christian call himself a friend of God when he behaves like an enemy?  He can’t.

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Contrived Community

I’m laying on the couch watching Morgan Spurlock’s Inside Man. There was this episode about Sunday Assembly, which is essentially an atheist church. I have heard about this type of church and I find it puzzling. Not only is an atheist church an oxymoron, I find that it is not much different than some churches today.

Spurlock was in Nashville visiting churches so that he could glean some inspiration for his atheist message. For the record, I’m not particularly fond of churches using the term “message” in place of “sermon.” It sounds so sanitized and secularized. Nonetheless, I was interested to see that real worship services were used as inspiration for this brave new church.

As I watched Spurlock’s reaction to hearing a  sermon regarding marriage and homosexuality, I could see him mentally disengaging. I know that this topic made the cut to reinforce the notion that Christians are judgmental and intolerant. Not only that, the mere mention of God garners a subtle response that believers are bonkers. I can live with that but I still find it peculiar for someone to look to the church to model an atheist church.

Many churches today perform contemporary Christo-pop songs quite badly and on this episode of Inside Man the secret of Sunday Assembly is revealed–badly played Bon Jovi and 80’s hair music and ego puffery. If you look at Joel Osteen, you get an unbiblical feel good message sanitized of the real Christ. Atheist church has its own brand of positive sentimentalism. It is actually alarming to see that many churches today are virtually indistinguishable from this new godless church movement.

I don’t see the point. To meet simply for community seems ridiculous to me. I know different people have different motivations for attending church. As for me, I’m going to worship Jesus. Everything else pales in comparison. I have numerous friends at church, but I don’t get up Sunday mornings to hang out with my buddies. I go to worship Jesus.

Maybe I’m just antisocial. Growing up I often found myself often excluded on the playground. Today I carry my phone everywhere and I get irritated if it rings. I sometimes get put out if I get a text. It keeps interrupting my candy crushing efforts.

What I’m trying to say is that meeting up with a bunch of people I may or may not know doesn’t feel much like community to me. I’d rather pile into the van with family and friends to feed the homeless instead of having some life coach facilitator telling me and the rest of the strangers that I can feel loved and included. It’s vacuous and empty without Christ. It is an exercise in self-importance.

I don’t have a problem with atheists meeting up for their godless church therapy sessions. I just find it pointless. If we really are just living to die, why waste it on some contrived sense of community? Are we really this disjointed as a society that we have to create a cheering section for our egos? If there is nothing after I die, my time is best spent as an epicurean. If this is it, why waste time when I can fulfill my desires and numb my senses?

Then again, how much different are some of today’s churches from Sunday Assembly? Not much.